CURRICULUM GOALS

Torah High is committed to providing our students with quality courses that apply to their secondary school diploma.  Torah High delivers and addresses all curriculum expectations as outlined by the Ministry of Education in the Curriculum Documents and adheres to the highest educational standards.

Engaging our students with course material and providing varied assessments and evaluations, as outlined in the Growing Success Document, ensures the success of each student. We foster an environment where the teacher works closely with the students in achieving their academic goals and developing their full potential.

Torah High strives to inspire Jewish teens in their commitment to Judaism by providing engaging and relevant classes that allow for all questions to be addressed and discussed. Torah High provides students with the information they need to live a fulfilling Jewish life and make more informed choices about their Jewish future.

Note: Students must remain in secondary school until the age of eighteen or until they have obtained an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD).  

Secondary School Credits

Torah High offers single credit courses.  A credit is earned when students receive a 50% grade or higher in a course.  A course must consist of a minimum of 110 instructional hours of planned learning activities that meet the course curriculum expectations.  A half credit may be granted for each 55-hour part of a 110-hour ministry developed course. Half credit courses must comply with ministry requirements as outlined in the curriculum policy documents.

“Scheduled time” is defined as the time during which students participate in planned learning activities including interactions between teacher and student and assigned individual and group work (other than homework) related to the expectations.  Planned learning activities are typically delivered through classroom instruction, field trips, seminars and independent study projects. Principals are authorized to grant credits on behalf of the Ministry of Education for courses developed or approved by the Ministry.

Types of Courses

Grades 9 and 10

There are three different types of courses offered in Grades 9-10.

Academic courses develop students’ knowledge and skills through the study of theory and abstract problems. These courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and explore related concepts as well. They incorporate practical applications as appropriate.

Applied courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and develop students’ knowledge and skills through practical applications and concrete examples. Familiar situations are used to illustrate ideas, and students are given more opportunities to experience hands-on applications of the concepts and theories they study.

Open courses which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college, or the workplace in mind.

Grades 11 and 12

There are five types of courses offered in Grades 11-12.

 College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for most college programs or for admission to specific apprenticeship or other training programs.

University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs.

University/College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for specific programs offered at universities and colleges.

Workplace preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the expectations of employers, if they plan to enter the workforce directly after graduation, or the requirements for admission to certain apprenticeship or other training programs.

Open courses which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college, or the workplace in mind.

Course Coding System

Course codes consist of five characters: three letters followed by a number and letter (For example, ENG3U means English, Grade 11, University level course)

The first three letters indicate the subject area and discipline.

Examples:

A = Arts

B = Business Studies

C = Canadian and World Studies

L = Classical and International Languages

I = Computer Studies

E = English

F = French

G = Guidance and Career Education

P = Health and Physical Education

M = Mathematics

N = Native Studies

S = Science

H = Social Sciences and the Humanities

T = Technological Education

 

The fourth character represents the grade.

1: Grade 9

2: Grade 10

3: Grade 11

4: Grade 12

 

The type of course and the course pathway is indicated in the last character of the course code.

D – Academic

O – Open

P – Applied

C – College

M – University/College

U -University

 

Each of the above types of credits can be used toward a Ontario Secondary School Diploma, however “U” and “M” level courses are designed to be used towards the acceptance into Ontario Universities and/or colleges.

*Torah High currently offers Academic, Open, University Preparation, and University/College Preparation Courses

Locally Developed Courses

 

Locally developed courses are developed by Torah High to accommodate students’ educational needs and provide our students with religion based subject matter that are not met through courses within the provincial curriculum policy documents. Such courses are reviewed and approved by the Ontario Ministry of Education Supervisory Officer.

 The following are locally developed courses specifically for Torah High Students:

 HRE13-Religious Studies

HRE23-Religious Studies

HRE33-Religious Studies

 

Prerequisite Courses

Courses in Grades 10, 11, and 12 may require prerequisites for enrollment.  Prerequisite courses are identified in ministry curriculum policy documents and school course calendars. When choosing courses, it is in a student’s best interests to select the prerequisites that will allow him or her to pursue the courses that he or she would want to take in the higher grades.

Torah High provides parents and students with clear information regarding the prerequisites needed to take particular courses.  Torah High reviews all prerequisites prior to students starting the course.

 

Waiving Prerequisite Courses:

Courses in Grade 11 and 12 may have prerequisites as a requirement for enrolment. If a parent or student requests, through a prerequisite waiver form, that a prerequisite be waived, the principal will determine whether the request is appropriate through a variety of means, including personal observation, oral and/or written examinations, etc., to determine whether the student is academically appropriate to have a prerequisite waived. After reviewing academic grade reports, consulting with parents, student, and the teacher(s) of the course, the Principal and/or other administrators will make the decision of whether a prerequisite should be waived.

Changing Course Types

There are times when students will change their educational goals and may require a change of course types. In Grades 10-12, given that the prerequisite of a course is met, students may change into a new course.  If the prerequisite has not been met, students may take summer, night, independent study project, or an e-learning course to obtain the specified prerequisite.  If the principal believes that a student can be successful in the new course, without the prerequisite, the principal may waive the prerequisite.

 

Withdrawal from a Course:

According to the full disclosure policy of The Ontario Ministry of Education, students who withdraw from a Grade 11 or 12 course more than five instructional days after the second report card is issued in a non-semester school will have the course recorded a “W” for withdrawal, and the student’s percentage mark at the time of withdrawal will be documented in the “Percentage Mark” column.

   Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR)

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) is a formal evaluation and accreditation process where students enrolled in public, private, or independent learning centres may have their skills and knowledge evaluated against the provincial curriculum policy document in order to earn credits toward their secondary school diploma.  The PLAR procedure involves the challenge component, where students’ prior learning is assessed with the purpose of determining whether prior learning has met provincial curriculum expectations, and the equivalency component, where credentials from other jurisdictions are assessed. The PLAR process is carried out under the direction of the principal.

Torah High does not award credit equivalencies for Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR).

 

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